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Feasibility of Total Body Score (TBS) and Accumulated Degree Days (ADD) in the Estimation of Postmortem Interval for Forensic Murder Casework
Biomed. Sci. Lett. 2018;24:35-42
Published online March 31, 2018;  https://doi.org/10.15616/BSL.2018.24.1.35
© 2018 The Korean Society For Biomedical Laboratory Sciences.

Young Sam Kim1, Jong Hee Kim1, Kwang Sang Yoon1, Bong Soo Kweon1, Young Sik Kim1, Gwang Yeon Lee1, Hae-Won Cho2, Hye-Rim Kim2 and Yong-Bin Eom2,†

1Forensic Investigation Section, Detective Division, Gyeonggi Bukbu Provincial Police Agency, Uijeongbu, Gyeonggi 11763, Korea 2Department of Biomedical Laboratory Science, College of Medical Sciences, Soonchunhyang University, Asan, Chungnam 31538, Korea
Correspondence to: Yong-Bin Eom. Department of Biomedical Laboratory Science, College of Medical Sciences, Soonchunhyang University, 22 Soonchunhyang-ro, Shinchang-myeon, Asan-si, Chungcheongnam-do 31538, Korea. Tel: +82-41-530-3039, Fax: +82-41-530-3085, e-mail: omnibin@sch.ac.kr
Received December 26, 2017; Revised February 8, 2018; Accepted February 12, 2018.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
 Abstract
Postmortem interval (PMI) is very important in the crime scene investigation. However, it is very difficult to estimate of the interval since death after a decomposition. Recently, there have been various studies on the postmortem interval since a decomposition. In particular, the total body score (TBS) and accumulated degree days (ADD) used to estimate the postmortem interval after a decomposition. This study was conducted with the aim of applying the TBS and ADD to estimate the postmortem interval in real forensic caseworks. In first murder case, TBS was 12 and ADD value was 132, respectively. An estimated time of PMI was around 23:00 on June 21, and the suspect's statement was 01:20 on June 22. Our estimated interval since death and the suspect's statement for the PMI differ by only 2 hours and 20 minutes. In second forensic case, TBS was 3 and ADD value was 55, respectively, an estimated time of PMI was around 02:26 on September 23. The suspect's statement was 10:30 on September 23. Our estimated time and the suspect's statement for the PMI differ by 8 hours. In these cases, we were able to have confirmed the feasibility of TBS and ADD on the real forensic cases. Overall, our finding suggested that the quantitative method could be used to produce PMI estimates that are accurate to within days or even hours.
Keywords : Postmortem interval, Decomposition, Total body score, Accumulated degree days